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The storyteller: Claire Battershill

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Though it has long been the case that Canada boasts a staggering number of absurdly talented writers of short fiction, the form has languished under the shadow of its bulkier, more unwieldy cousin, the novel. Perhaps all that started to change in 2013, when Alice Munro became the first Canadian resident to win the Nobel Prize for Literature and Lynn Coady won the Scotiabank Giller Prize for her second collection, <i>Hellgoing</i>. <br /> <br /> <p>The recognition of established short-story writers is encouraging, as is the continued appearance of promising newcomers. One such author is <b>Claire Battershill</b>, a native of Dawson Creek, B.C., who is already an award-winning writer. Battershill's story "Circus" won the 2008 CBC Literary Award for Short Fiction and shared the Emerging Writers Award from the Canadian Authors Association, and her story "The Collective Name for Ninjas" was shortlisted for the inaugural PEN International/New Voices Award. Both of Battershill's lauded stories appear in her debut collection, <i>Circus</i> ($22 pa.), which also features "Two-Man Luge: A Love Story," set at the Winter Olympics, and a story about a British bureaucrat who gives himself 31 days to find love online. Find out what all the fuss is about when McClelland & Stewart publishes the book in April. <i>"“ Steven W. Beattie</i></p>
The storyteller: Claire Battershill
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chairebattershill

Though it has long been the case that Canada boasts a staggering number of absurdly talented writers of short fiction, the form has languished under the shadow of its bulkier, more unwieldy cousin, the novel. Perhaps all that started to change in 2013, when Alice Munro became the first Canadian resident to win the Nobel Prize for Literature and Lynn Coady won the Scotiabank Giller Prize for her second collection, Hellgoing.

The recognition of established short-story writers is encouraging, as is the continued appearance of promising newcomers. One such author is Claire Battershill, a native of Dawson Creek, B.C., who is already an award-winning writer. Battershill’s story “Circus” won the 2008 CBC Literary Award for Short Fiction and shared the Emerging Writers Award from the Canadian Authors Association, and her story “The Collective Name for Ninjas” was shortlisted for the inaugural PEN International/New Voices Award. Both of Battershill’s lauded stories appear in her debut collection, Circus ($22 pa.), which also features “Two-Man Luge: A Love Story,” set at the Winter Olympics, and a story about a British bureaucrat who gives himself 31 days to find love online. Find out what all the fuss is about when McClelland & Stewart publishes the book in April. ““ Steven W. Beattie