Quill and Quire

Fiction: Novels

By Kevin Hardcastle

Kevin Hardcastle’s debut novel demonstrates that the violent depredations dramatized in the fiction of Cormac McCarthy are not confined to the Texas–Mexico border: rural Canada works just fine as a locale. In the Cage finds ... Read More »

August 14, 2017 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By Wayne Johnston

The publication of Wayne Johnston’s 1998 novel, The Colony of Unrequited Dreams, brought as much consternation as praise. While Johnston’s portrayal of Newfoundland’s “father of Confederation,” Joey Smallwood, proved contentious, another character emerged as a ... Read More »

August 14, 2017 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By Martha Baillie

Martha Baillie’s sixth novel is a metafictional story told from the points of view of four characters: Clara, a reclusive, mentally ill writer; Julia, a curator and Clara’s sister, who questions Clara’s sanity; Maurice, Julia’s ... Read More »

August 14, 2017 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By Michael Redhill

With Bellevue Square, the first panel of a projected triptych titled Modern Ghosts, Michael Redhill puts his protagonist, Jean Mason, through wringer after wringer. As witnesses and vicarious participants, readers can appreciate Jean’s otherworldly predicaments, ... Read More »

July 31, 2017 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By Eliza Robertson

It’s a rite of passage for young novelists to tackle rites of passage: the sun-dappled, backward-glancing, coming-of-age fable is as regimented and routinized as any lean-boned crime thriller or bulky, mock-Victorian doorstop. There is currently ... Read More »

July 31, 2017 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By Andrew Pyper

Those who think the horror genre is dying may have to reassess after reading Andrew Pyper’s latest work. The Toronto writer’s eighth novel, a neo-gothic adventure with more blood-feeding than a vampire weekend, comes complete ... Read More »

July 20, 2017 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By Roz Nay

Traditionally, the main engine of narrative, especially in commercial and genre fiction, can be boiled down to a simple question: what happens next? Everything else is subservient to that overarching concern, which, at its best, ... Read More »

July 13, 2017 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By Robyn Harding

Traditionally, the main engine of narrative, especially in commercial and genre fiction, can be boiled down to a simple question: what happens next? Everything else is subservient to that overarching concern, which, at its best, ... Read More »

July 13, 2017 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By Adam Sternbergh

“Damnatio Memorae,” reads graffiti sprayed across the walls of a trashed workshop in the remote Texas town of Caesura, the setting for Adam Sternbergh’s taut conceptual thriller, The Blinds. “The condemnation of memory”: that ominous ... Read More »

July 12, 2017 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By Cory Doctorow

In Walkaway, Cory Doctorow – author of the novel Little Brother and co-editor of the popular blog Boing Boing – offers a scathing critique of capitalism in the context of a near-future society in which ... Read More »

June 6, 2017 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By David Layton

In the 1930s, when many countries, including Canada, were turning away Jews fleeing Nazi Germany, one unlikely country actively sought out these refugees: the Dominican Republic. At the Evian Conference in 1938, the Caribbean island ... Read More »

May 29, 2017 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By Pasha Malla

In the wake of his father’s death, Ash, the 30-something Toronto-based host of a literary radio show, finds a single credible candidate for the position of “buddy.” Matt, who has been a more or less ... Read More »

May 29, 2017 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels