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Fall Preview and more in the July/August issue of Q&Q

quill-july2009coverFall is the season for “big” books, and this year is no exception, with new fiction from the likes of Margaret Atwood, Douglas Coupland, Louise Penny, Bonnie Burnard, and Alice Munro. In our 2009 fall preview, part of the July/August issue of Q&Q, we give you a first look at the season’s most exciting titles. Also in the issue, we look at authors’ options in the landmark Google book search settlement and investigate the troubled publishing history of Kunati Books.

Fall preview

Munro, Atwood, Coupland, Charles Pachter, David Adams Richards, and the long-awaited return of Bonnie Burnard and John Bemrose. A first look at the top titles of the season in fiction, non-fiction, kids’ books, and international titles

Publishing the Kunati way

When it launched two years ago Kunati Books aimed to take on the world, but instead it has become mired in accusations of unpaid royalties and missing financial statements

Settling with Google

With the opt-out deadline fast approaching in the landmark Google book search settlement, Q&Q explains your options

FRONTMATTER

  • Michael Turner goes off the grid
  • Eric Walters: does the man sleep?
  • Local Buzz: Langley through the ages
  • Cover to Cover: Jason Guriel’s Pure Product
  • Snapshot: Penguin Canada rights and contracts co-ordinator John Kruusi
  • Daniel Poliquin takes on René Lévesque

REVIEWS

  • The Golden Mean by Annabel Lyon
  • The Wife’s Tale by Lori Lansens
  • Welcome to the Urban Revolution: How Cities Are Changing the World by Jeb Brugmann
  • Plus more fiction, non-fiction, and poetry

BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE

  • Night Flight by Mireille Messier and Carl Pelletier
  • Jacob Two-Two on the High Seas by Cary Fagan and DuÅ¡an Petricic
  • When Stella Was Very, Very Small by Marie-Louise Gay
  • Plus more fiction, non-fiction, and picture books

THE Q&Q/BOOKNET CANADA BESTSELLERS

THE LAST WORD

The rewards of being a full-time author rarely include money, writes Katherine Ashenburg