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November Q&Q: Don Gillmor

quill-nov2009coverThe cover star for the November Q&Q, now on newsstands, is journalist and historian Don Gillmor, whose first novel for adults, Kanata, is being published this month by Viking Canada. Also in the issue, Q&Q looks at the Ontario Arts Council under its new literary officer, and we weigh the benefits of The Writers’ Union of Canada’s health insurance plan for writers. All that, plus our College and Scholarly Publishing Special Report and reviews of more than 35 new books, including Kate Pullinger’s The Mistress of Nothing, John Bemrose’s The Last Woman, Wade Davis’s The Wayfinders, and Frieda Wishinsky’s Maggie Can’t Wait.

In search of the West

In his first novel, Don Gillmor puts an overlooked cartographer, explorer, and extraordinary Canadian back on the map

Kicked off the block

Have the rules of the funding game changed under the Ontario Art Council’s new literature officer?

The cut-and-paste method

Digital technology has led to customized products for the scholarly market “ but are they a good deal for academic presses? Plus more in the College and Scholarly Publishing Special Report

Children’s Announcements

The season’s complete listings

FRONTMATTER

Reviewing the ReLits

Weighing the benefits of the Writers’ Coalition health plan

The future of the AECB

Local Buzz: Keith Halliday’s Game On Yukon!

Cover to Cover: Kennepohl and Shaw’s Accessible Elements

Snapshot: Bryan Jay Ibeas of Cormorant Books

COLLEGE AND SCHOLARLY REPORT

CSPI’s unlikely feminism

Free e-books for everyone

Revisiting the Canadian Research Knowledge Network

REVIEWS

The Last Woman by John Bemrose

Dracula the Un-Dead by Dacre Stoker and Ian Holt

Monstrous Affections by David Nickle

Plus more fiction, non-fiction, and poetry

BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE

The Pirate and the Penguin by Patricia Storms

Proud as a Peacock, Brave as a Lion by Jane Barclay and Renné Benoir

The Rocket by Mike Leonetti and Greg Banning

Plus more fiction, non-fiction, and picture books

THE LAST WORD

Authors who complain about bad reviews need to grow up, writes Claude Lalumière