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M&S leads Giller longlist

The Canadian literary awards season is officially underway following this morning’s announcement of the Scotiabank Giller Prize longlist. The publisher with the most to celebrate is arguably McClelland & Stewart, which leads with three nominated titles. HarperCollins Canada and House of Anansi Press are the only other publishers with multiple nominations.

However, there are several notable snubs on this year’s longlist. Some of the year’s most buzzed about books have been overlooked, including Emma Donoghue’s Room (HarperCollins Canada), Yann Martel’s Beatrice & Virgil (Knopf Canada), and Miguel Syjuco’s Ilustrado (Hamish Hamilton Canada). In fact, Penguin Canada did not receive any nominations after having two titles on last year’s shortlist. And for the first time in more than a decade, the imprints of Random House of Canada (i.e., Doubleday Canada, Knopf Canada) did not receive any nominations.

The complete 13-title longlist is below:

  • David Bergen, The Matter with Morris (HarperCollins Canada)
  • Douglas Coupland, Player One (House of Anansi Press)
  • Michael Helm, Cities of Refuge (McClelland & Stewart)
  • Alexander MacLeod, Light Lifting (Biblioasis)
  • Avner Mandelman, The Debba (Other Press/Random House of Canada)
  • Tom Rachman, The Imperfectionists (Dial/Random House of Canada)
  • Sarah Selecky, This Cake Is for the Party (Thomas Allen Publishers)
  • Johanna Skibsrud, The Sentimentalists (Gaspereau Press)
  • Cordelia Strube, Lemon (Coach House Books)
  • Joan Thomas, Curiosity (McClelland & Stewart)
  • Jane Urquhart, Sanctuary Line (McClelland & Stewart)
  • Dianne Warren, Cool Water (HarperCollins Canada)
  • Kathleen Winter, Annabel (House of Anansi Press)

This year’s jury, comprised of Michael Enright, Claire Messud, and Ali Smith, had this to say about the longlist: “This is a vibrant and exciting list. We came very harmoniously to our final decision, which, in the ranging of its featured books between astonishing debuts and brilliant new work by already well-known, major Canadian writers, and between the historical and the contemporary, the traditional and the experimental, the long, the short and the unexpected in both story and form, stands as a showcase in its own right of the vision, the energy, the internationalism and the open-eyed versatility of contemporary Canadian fiction.”

The Giller shortlist will be announced on Oct. 5.