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I Can’t Believe It’s Not Better: A Woman’s Guide to Coping with Life

by Monica Heisey

From Tina Fey to Amy Poehler to Lena Dunham, comedic memoirs by famous funny females have been successfully climbing up the bestseller lists for the past few years. Canadian-born writer and comedian Monica Heisey doesn’t have the same  name recognition, but that’s actually part of her appeal: she’s relatable, unpretentious, and self-effacing. Reading Heisey’s irreverent and provocative debut book is like spending the evening with your smart and sassy BFF – her words leap off the page like you’re having a cozy night in chatting over a giant burrito or a greasy pizza (two of Heisey’s greatest loves).

I Can’t Believe It’s Not Better: A Woman’s Guide to Coping with Life Monica HeiseyAs a writer for Vice, Playboy, and Cosmopolitan, Heisey has developed a style that uses humour as a mode to tackle topics both serious and silly. Her real talk on body image is as on point as her how-to guide on eating in bed (key takeaways: use a plate to avoid crumbs and don’t bring in a full jar of hummus lest you stink up the room).

You might not learn much from her poem about cheese or her Buzzfeed-like quiz on which of her past fashion mistakes you are (although you’ll definitely have a good laugh over both), but Heisey also shares some clever words of hard-earned wisdom on subjects such as the importance of taking care of yourself  and how to break up with someone without being a jerk. Shy or prudish readers should beware, though: Heisey isn’t the type of person to care whether you think something is TMI. She shares everything, from sex stories to tales of barfing at 30,000 feet.

With lists, quizzes, and illustrations adjoining essays on how to take sexy selfies and tips for binge-watching TV shows, the twentysomething writer is squarely targeting her book at fellow female millennials. But whether they are currently making their way through so-called new adulthood, or their memories of that time are hazy at best, women will hear echoes of themselves in Heisey’s stories and laugh out loud with recognition.